Archive | Uncategorized RSS feed for this section

Anthropology: A Love Story

15 Feb Featured Image -- 459

Welcome to the AAA Blog

Why do you S_S-Classic-Heart-Pink_1024x1024 anthropology? The AAA is getting an early start to this year’s Anthropology Day celebration by spending our Valentine’s Day reflecting on why we fell in love with anthropology.

Read the anthropology love stories below from AAA President Alisse Waterston and our Executive Director Ed Liebow. Then share your own story with us in the comments!

Alisse Waterston, President, American Anthropological Association
President Scholar in Anthropology, Department of Anthropology
City University of New York- John Jay College of Criminal Justice

For Anthropology Day 2016, I said I love anthropology for helping me understand the world as it exists (which is not necessarily the world as I want it to be) and for providing me the intellectual tools to understand the human capacity for cleverness, creativity, connection as well as delusion and other dangerous capabilities. In our surreal political times, these human attributes seem to be on bloated display.

View original post 251 more words

Is sex a social construct like gender? Nope.

14 Feb

Why Evolution Is True

The video below, highlighted on Everyday Feminism, came with a few words on the website:

“Yes, trans women are women, but they’re still biologically male.”

Ever thought or said something like this? You might even have good intentions by stating what you think is a simple fact – after all, gender is a social construct, while sex is biological, right?

Actually, this “simple fact” of trans women being “biologically male” is inaccurate – and this misrepresentation of the truth is being used to justify some pretty hateful things.

So if you really want the facts, and to follow through on your good intentions by being a good ally, check out Riley J. Dennis’ explanation of why trans women are not biologically male.

With Love,
The Editors at Everyday Feminism

Well, I’d like to be a good ally, but not by denying the truth. And, in fact, sex is indeed biological—not a…

View original post 1,805 more words

Selective tool use in ants

10 Jan

Very interesting post from Jerry Coyne’s site. Enjoy!

Why Evolution Is True

You’re probably aware that tool use, once considered a uniquely human phenomenon, has now been documented widely in primates and birds. You may not know, though, that it’s also been seen in some insects, as in wasps that use pebbles to close off their burrows after laying eggs. Ants, too, have been seen to use debris from the environment to transport liquid food back to the nest; the ants that do this have a non-expandable crop, so they can’t simply suck up the stuff and then regurgitate it to their nestmates.

Now, in a new paper in Animal Behaviour by István Maák and his colleagues (link and free download below), we find that two species of the funnel ant Aphaenogaster not only use tools to suck up liquid food, but are selective in which tools they use. The authors collected colonies of A. senilis and A. subterranea, and presented…

View original post 839 more words

#AnthroForward Post-Election Resources

16 Dec

Welcome to the AAA Blog

On December 7th the AAA asked our members to join us in a live discussion on Twitter to share post-election resources and suggest ways we can proactively engage in positive activities in our own communities. Using #AnthroForward we were able to identify collective actions anthropologists can undertake and compile a solid set of resources to support the anthropological community. An archive of the Twitter chat can be found here. The following is a list of resources shared through the #AnthroForward discussion and emails from our members:

View original post 226 more words

Public Anthropology is More Important Than Ever

12 Nov Featured Image -- 443

The Geek Anthropologist

As The Geek Anthropologist has expanded over the past several years, the editors have had a number of discussions about our identity as an online publication. Though our project, broadly speaking, is to provide anthropological sensibility to geek culture broadly defined, that ethnographic orientation also involves a predisposition towards activism. When Marie-Pierre first began the blog back in 2012, her posts on representations of indigeneity, fake geek girls, and the political ramifications of video games were informed by the importance of radical inclusion, respect and a recognition that anthropology is a platform for social justice as much as it is a discipline for studying human difference. As our team grew and the pieces we promoted began to diversify, we’ve discussed the extent to which our politics should inform the kinds of material we want to publish. These branding conversations occurred contemporaneously with the growing vitriol and anger in sub-groups of…

View original post 1,593 more words

Natural selection in our species during the last two millennia

22 Oct

Why Evolution Is True

A question I’m always asked in popular lectures on evolution is this: “Are humans still evolving?” The answer I give is “Yes, but we have good evidence for such evolution in only a handful of traits: evolution of earlier reproductive maturity in females, later menopause, and selection for reduced blood pressure and a few other traits related to heart disease.” That is based on longitudinal studies of human health over decades, observing changes in these traits and presumed estimates of the genetic basis of their variation.

Now, however, we can, by DNA sequencing, look at DNA directly, and with some fancy statistical footwork, get an idea of which genes have changed in frequency so fast that they must have been due to positive natural selection. That’s the subject of a new paper in Science by Yair Field et al. (reference and free download below).  The authors conclude that several…

View original post 880 more words

Anthropology Feels Like Home

21 Jul

Welcome to the AAA Blog

This post was submitted by Callie Randall, a high school senior and anthropology student interning with the AAA.

When I was a little girl, I began to realize I was different than a lot of my peers. It was beyond the apparent truth of being the only black kid in gifted or intensified classes and more than feeling like I was the only child that said please and thank you to the lunch ladies. It was something less transparent. My ability to acknowledge the things that made me different set me apart from many others. In the simplest of terms, I was observant. I took in my surroundings everywhere. As I got older, I tried to understand why things were the way they were and why people chose to do certain things or why they chose to not. The world was big and beautiful and mysterious and with wide eyes everything…

View original post 950 more words